Tag: Alberta

Bull Skinny Scarf

The “Bull Skinny Scarf” was created as an ode to Western Canada.

The bull motif was designed as a tribute to western culture; that of ranches, rodeos and stampedes.

The scarf’s narrower width, and longer length, allows for the scarf to be worn in multiple ways. A great scarf for those who like to experiment with clothes, and a distinctive way to add a unique touch to both dressy and casual outfits.

This one-of-a-kind knit scarf features hand dyeing with botanical dyes, proving that environmentally conscious fashion can also be beautiful.

To purchase the “Bull Skinny Scarf”, and our current offering of other pieces, please visit our online shop .

Open Studio Door – Prep Work – February 19, 2022

Our “Open Studio Door” posts are a way to invite readers into our studio. This is a way to share daily studio activities, and all the methods involved in creating our pieces.

Today in the studio, prep work for creating knitwear, and woven pieces, is the focus.

Every piece begins life with un-dyed yarn. The main fibres we currently work with are wool. alpaca, cotton, bamboo and Tencel.

The yarn is initially knit into blanks in preparation for dyeing. This method may be time consuming, but eliminates dealing with knots and tangles in the dyeing process.

Once the blanks are complete, the dyeing process commences.

Usually dyeing is completed over multiple days, sometimes weeks.

Once the blanks have been dyed, they are then stripped back to yarn form, in preparation for knitting or weaving.

Prep work can take as long as the actual knitting or weaving process, depending on how fine the yarn is, or how complex the dyeing process is.

To view our pieces currently available, please click HERE.

Open Studio Door – Iron Dip – February 17, 2022

Iron Dip

Our “Open Studio Door” posts are a way to invite readers into our studio. This is a way to share daily studio activities, and all the methods involved in creating our pieces.

Today in the studio we are completing iron dips. When botanically dyed fibres are dipped in an iron bath, it “saddens” the color. Colors become darker and grey.

Today, I am working with bamboo, dyed in cutch.

The fibre goes into the iron bath as a mid brown tone, and emerges, as dark brown.

Iron dips are an incredibly useful tool when working with botanical dyes and cellulose fibres. It creates the opportunity to create darker colors, which is challenging to accomplish with natural dyeing.


To view our pieces currently available, please click HERE.