Tag: clothing

Up Close

Do you ever look at how pieces are made, close up?
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This is pretty cool, so I thought I would share it. This is a toque being tailored while being knit. It is a detail most people won’t notice, but it makes a huge difference. This tailoring makes for a classic shaped toque that follows the shape of the head. It takes twice as long to make a toque using this method, but the result is so nice. This style of toque is also zero-waste and incorporates hand stitching.
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We are currently working on some new pieces. Summer scarves, statement pieces, and some classic knits. With this work in progress, the online shop is in maintenance mode for a few days. However, if you see something that interests you in the next few days, feel free to send a message and we can chat details.
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http://www.w1hundred.com

 

#marchmeetthemaker – time

As we continue with #marchmeetthemaker, the next theme to discuss is “Time” . Such an interesting topic. In creating ethical textiles, everything takes a lot of time. Designing. Prepping . Dyeing. Knitting. Finishing.
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Time is also a huge factor in how items are priced. Pricing of items is based solely on two factors, the materials used, and the time it takes to produce a piece. Each piece is weighed to determine the amount of materials used, and timed for the labor allowance when determining price. The most expensive portion of creating a piece is the actual time spent making the piece.
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Certain types of pieces have higher price points reflecting the time spent creating it. Large pieces, like scarves, take longer to knit. Technical pieces, like a sweater, take a very long time, as can textured or fine knit pieces. Dyed pieces can be the most expensive, due to the fibre prep, dyeing, and skeining; naturally dyed pieces are very labor intensive.
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Time is a major factor in the world of handcrafted ethical knitwear.
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@w1hundred  (on Instagram and Facebook)
http://www.w1hundred.com

 

Osage

Natural dyeing day. Today I am dyeing with osage wood chips. The wood chips are steeped , much like tea, before beginning the dyeing process. This natural dye will provide a yellow color to the organic cotton knits that will be dyed over the next few days.

Natural dyeing is a slow process. It is not unusual for pieces to spend days in the dye pot with adjustments being made. Each dyeing session provides slightly different results, part of the joy of creating natural fashion.

New spring and summer cotton pieces coming soon to the shop.